Reformers

Investigators, lawyers, and activists overhauling Washington and holding the powerful accountable

Alex Flint

Alex Flint
Executive Director, Alliance for Market Solutions

Longtime Republican lobbyist and Capitol Hill staffer Alex Flint wants lawmakers to know that conservative values demand action on climate change.

Flint is urging Republicans to embrace a carbon tax to kill two birds with one stone: averting the catastrophic climate conditions predicted by scientists, while staving off a top-down regulatory regime that mandates drastic emissions reductions.

Ben Chevat
Executive Director of 9/11 Health Watch
Executive Director of Citizens for the Extension of the James Zadroga Act

Ben Chevat was working as Rep. Carolyn Maloney’s chief of staff during the Sept. 11 attacks. Chevat and his colleagues were evacuated from the Rayburn House Office Building, and he could see the smoke rising from the Pentagon.

Chevat may have left Capitol Hill, but he didn’t stop working to ensure that 9/11 first responders are taken care of.

Daniel Garza

Daniel Garza
President, The Libre Initiative

When Daniel Garza’s parents arrived in America, they couldn’t speak English, didn’t have driver’s licenses, and hadn’t graduated high school. Garza is now president of the Libre Initiative, a Koch-backed group that is perhaps the only national organization working to promote capitalist values among Latinos. 

For Garza, it isn’t just about advocacy. It’s about eliminating the practical barriers, especially the three his parents faced, that keep Latinos from getting a fair shot in the free market. 

Danielle Brian

Danielle Brian
Executive Director, Project on Government Oversight

Danielle Brian is one of the most prominent defenders of the whistle-blower process and congressional oversight, working to fill a vital role left by the decrease in oversight staff since the 1990s and actively root out the “waste, fraud, and abuse” elected officials in both parties have long made a staple of their platforms.

Brian said it’s “terrific” to see a national conversation on the importance of whistle-blowers.

Jeff Kosseff

Jeff Kosseff
Assistant Professor of Cybersecurity Law at the United States Naval Academy

A journalist-turned-lawyer, Kosseff resolved several years ago to write the history of an arcane little statute few outside the tech community had ever heard of—Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, or in Kosseff’s description, The 26 Words That Created the Internet.

When Kosseff began work several years ago, he was unaware of a gathering storm brewing around Section 230. But as violent, hateful, harassing, and illegal content proliferates online, Washington policymakers of all stripes are now eager to carve up the statute. 

Neal Katyal

Neal Katyal
Partner at Hogan Lovells, Georgetown Law Professor

President Trump’s July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky reignited Democrats’ calls for impeachment and, to Katyal, represented a “fundamental threat” to democracy that couldn’t be ignored. The case for impeachment this time, he said, was much clearer.

Katyal has a book out this month, Impeach: The Case Against Donald Trump. The backbone of that argument, for Democrats, should be Trump’s quid-pro-quo request for help from Ukraine, he said. “[The Ukraine scandal] is so central to what our republic is about, and also so simple to understand,” he said. 

Noah Bookbinder

Noah Bookbinder
Executive Director, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington

Under Bookbinder’s leadership Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, previously best-known for its annual list of the most corrupt members of Congress, has aggressively pursued administration records through Freedom of Information Act filings and lawsuits on issues ranging from the Mueller investigation to the donation of fireworks for the National Park Service’s annual Fourth of July celebrations and conflicts of interest at the Trump International Hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue.